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Saturday, Sunday, and Monday: Congregation Rodeph Sholom, 7 W. 83rd Street, New York, NY 10024

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Sunday, February 17 • 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Should Justice Be Blind? Jewish Reflections on Judicial Impartiality, Legislative Favoritism, and Substantive Justice

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Recent political fights in the U.S. and around the world have raised fundamental questions about our legal system: Should judges be impartial arbiters or attentive to the situation of the litigants and the societal implications of their rulings? Is law ideally a set of neutral principles, or is it a tool for protecting the weak? Judaism has grappled with these questions since its inception, and in this session we will mine our ancient texts for insights into these contentious questions.

Presenters
WF

William Friedman

William Friedman is a doctoral candidate at Harvard University, writing on Legal Reasoning in Tannaitic Law. He received rabbinic ordination from Daniel Landes. Although he has learned and taught at many Jewish learning institutions, the Pardes Beit Midrash has been his home for more... Read More →


Sunday February 17, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 11 (5th Floor)